The RealCADD Manual Mac version
RealCADD Cursors
RealCADD Select cursor
RealCADD Object is selectable
RealCADD Select has found an endpoint
RealCADD Select has found a centre
RealCADD Select has found an intersection
RealCADD Select has found a surface (periphery)
RealCADD Select is in parallel mode
RealCADD Select can draw a parallel
RealCADD Lasso cursor
RealCADD Hand cursor
RealCADD Zoom cursor
RealCADD Text entry cursor
RealCADD Draw cursor
RealCADD Draw from centre cursor
RealCADD Draw by diameter cursor
RealCADD Draw by three points cursor
RealCADD Draw cursor has found an end point
RealCADD Draw cursor has found a centre
RealCADD Draw cursor has found an intersection
RealCADD Draw cursor has found a periphery
RealCADD Can draw a perpendicular
RealCADD Can draw a tangent
RealCADD Lines up horizontally
RealCADD Lines up vertically
RealCADD Lines up both horizontally & vertically
RealCADD Rotate or symmetry cursor
RealCADD Rotate cursor has found an endpoint
RealCADD Rotate cursor has found a centre
RealCADD Rotate cursor has found an intersection
RealCADD Cutting tool is active
   
Window >> Tools – Parallels, Cutting & Rotating

Select and click under the Window menu for the pallet to be displayed and active. Marked with a ✓ in the Window menu when active.

RealCADDRealCADDThe Tools pallet accesses RealCADD's drawing, operating and modifying tools. When you mouse over the pallet, it expands to show the full range of tools available. If you have "Display helptags" enabled in Preferences, hovering over a tool for a moment will display its helptag.

To see details of how the tools work, click the appropriate tool row on the right-hand image and scroll down. The red dot RealCADD indicates which selection you are on. The descriptions are based on the standard Mac Click & Drag drawing mode. If you have selected Click & Click in Preferences, then there will be minor differences.

Row 01 Row 02 Row 03 Row 04 Row 05 Row 06 Row 07 Row 08 Row 09 Row 10

Tools with .. after them can be expanded to a fuller options menu by a double-click or an ⌥-click (option-click). From version 4.63b6, once a tool that has a further options menu has been selected, you can bring up the further options by hitting the space bar – this is very handy if you want to go on using the tool but merely want to change its action in some way.

Many tools have single-keystroke keyboard shortcuts. A tool remains active until another tool is selected either by clicking on its icon or hitting its keyboard shortcut.

Also from version 4.63b6 you can choose (in Preferences >> General) to have the Tools pallet expanded all the time by unchecking the "Tools" box. This overcomes a problem under some systems and set-ups where RealCADD crashes, seemingly as you mouse over and expand the Tools pallet. If you do experience this problem, then unchecking the auto-retract for Tools will fix it.

With "Tools" (this section) you draw an object (Line, Rectangle, Oval, Arc) approximately how you want it and then edit it in the Edit and Attributes pallets to get it exactly how you want it. The Edit pallet in particular is intimately bound up with drawing using the Tools and we will discuss it here along with each tool. Refer to Window >> Attributes for more details of that pallet.

Remember also that you can access all of, or your selection of, the tools by a right-click or a ⌃-left-click (control-left-click) anywhere in the drawing. The tools that are displayed are those chosen in Preferences >> "Tools" menu ... For a tool that has further options (those marked with double-dots in the Tools pallet), ⌥-right-click (option-right-click) or ⌃-⌥-left-click (control-option-left-click) as you select the tool will bring up the further options. Once you have selected the tool, if it is one that has further options, these can be accessed by hitting the space bar (version 4.63b6 onwards).

Tip: The screen version of the Tools pallet is only available when no object is selected. A right-click with an object selected will bring up the screen version of the Action menu.

With "Command Line" you draw an object (Line, Rectangle, Oval, Arc) and set its parameters on the fly as you draw. Refer to Window >> Command line.

Snap is also an important part of controlling how objects are drawn. Refer to Window >> Snap for details of how to set Snap up.

RealCADD cursors change to indicate many important aspects of using Tools; rather than endlessly discuss these changes in each section, they are listed in the table to the far right. Those that require Snap to be active are shown in green

Tip: The Surface cursor RealCADD requires "Intersection" to be selected in the Snap pallet

Tip: Once you have one or more RealCADD files open, they will be displayed at the bottom of the Window menu and can be selected from there to change from one to another.

RealCADD From left to right these are:

RealCADDParallels – Static:

A double-click or an ⌥-click (option-click) will bring up the menu to the right.

The Static menu is the original RealCADD parallels menu – also available from Action >> Parallels and Edit >> Parallels.... We recommend accessing it from here for best.

The problem with the original Static menu is that "in/left" and "out/right" for a line depend on which way a line is drawn. Drawn from Right to Left, or Bottom to Top, the parallels will work as expected. Otherwise, they will work opposite to expectations. And it gets very hard to remember which way lines and were drawn.

With other objects (rectangles, ovals, arcs, irregular polygons and regular polygons) it does work as expected – "in/left" draws a parallel inwards; "out/right" draws a parallel outwards.

The menu is quite straightforward:

Parallel in/left. Check this box to draw in or left.

Number: Enter the number of parallels you want. 1 gets you one parallel, 2 gets you two and so on.

Distance: Enter the distance you want each successive parallel to be from the previous one.

Parallel out/right. Check this box to draw out or right.

Number: Enter the number of parallels you want. 1 gets you one parallel, 2 gets you two and so on.

Distance: Enter the distance you want each successive parallel to be from the previous one.

New objects on Active layer. If checked does exactly what it says: it places the new parallels on the active layer. Otherwise the new parallels will be on whatever layer the original is on.

Once you have set it up, click the OK button to close the menu.

To draw the parallel(s), select the parallels tool and click on the object you want to draw from. Parallels will be drawn as you have set up the menu.

Tip: You can draw both "in/left" and "out/right" at the same time.

Tip: Very long complex polycurves can have problems and don't always behave as they theoretically should. The simple answer is to set up both "in/left" and "out/right", draw both parallels and then delete he one you don't want. The minor inconvenience far outweighs the benefit of being able to draw accurate parallels to complex lines.

Tip: A polyline (that is actually a polygon) draws parallel accurately and shortens or lengthens all the constituent lines that make it up. Conversely, if you convert a polyline to lines (⌥⌘L) and then group it (⌘G), drawing a parallel doesn't work – it only draws parallels one line at a time. The solution is to use Join (⌘J) and then convert back to a polygon (⌥⌘P).

Tip: Making "Walls". You can use Parallels in conjunction with the Line tool to make walls. For a wall drawn about a middle, specify both "in/left" and "out/right" in the Parallels window. Then select the Line tool and hold down the ⌥ (Option) key as you start to draw. You will get a triple line, with the outer lines the specified distances from the middle line. Once started, you can let go the ⌥ (Option) key. Holding down the ⇧ (Shift) key will restrain the lines to one of the constraint angles set in Preferences. As you finish, hold down the ⌃ (Control) key and the middle line will be deleted – keep the ⇧ (Shift) key down at the same time to retain the constraint. Then draw the next wall, using Snap to start at the end of your first wall. Trim the join using the "Cut and extend tool". You can also draw from the left or right side by setting one Number and Distance to 0 and the other the width you want your wall.

RealCADDParallels – Dynamic:

This is achieved by clicking the Dynamic tab at the top of the menu window:

Number: Enter the number of parallels you want. 1 gets you one parallel, 2 gets you two and so on.

Offset: Enter the distance you want each successive parallel to be from the previous one.

New objects on Active layer. If checked does exactly what it says: it places the new parallels on the active layer. Otherwise the new parallels will be on whatever layer the original is on.

There are three modes of operation:

Single offset: If you enter (say) 5 in Number and 50 in Offset, you will get five new objects each 50 distant from the previous one (and the original of course)

Multiple offset: Again, if you enter 5 in Number and 50 in Offset, you will get five new objects, but the further you drag, the further apart the parallel objects will be – but the distance will always be a multiple of the Offset (so, increasing from 50 to 100 to 150 and so on). All will be the same distance (at whatever multiple of the Offset they are at)

Interactive offset: This ignores the offset completely, just drawing the number of parallels specified. The further you drag, the further apart they get, but they continue to maintain equal distances between them.

Once you have set up your Dynamic menu, click OK to close it. To draw a parallel or parallels, click the parallel tool and move near to the object you want to draw parallel(s) from. When the select cursor changes to indicate that parallels can be drawn, drag whichever side of the original object you want the parallel(s) to be. This basically overcomes the directional problems with Static Parallels.

Tip: Occasionally, with complex polylines and polycurves, often imported via dxf or dwg, a dynamic parallel will only draw a parallel in one direction whichever direction you drag in. In this case, if you can't get a parallel in the direction you want, revert to a Static mode. I have noticed that when this happens, selecting "Parallel in/left" most always seems to be what is needed!

RealCADDCutting tool: Keyboard shortcut M

This is a simple but remarkably effective and very useful tool

The sketch to the right shows red and green horizontal lines crossed by a blue vertical line. We want to cut and remove the part of the blue line between the red and green lines.

Select the tool and as you approach the portion of line to be cut off, the cursor changes to the pointing finger, indicating that the cut can be made. Click the mouse button and the section of blue line between the red and green lines will be cut and deleted.

The tool will cut and delete any portion of a line, until it intersects another line, or any other object (rectangle, oval, arc, polygon etc.)

RealCADDTip: While the tool will cut lines that intersect objects, it cannot cut the objects themselves. If you try to you will get this little message!

Tip: In a complex drawing where there are a lot of lines close together, sometimes the tool will cut the wrong line. Simply zoom the section of drawing until the pointing finger is clearly on the line you want to cut.

Rotation tool:

The rotation tool can rotate an object freely, in contrast to Action >> Rotation... (⌘R), where you specify the angle through which the rotation should occur, or Action >> Symmetry with axis, where you specify the axis about which an object is rotated.

Objects can be rotated about any point, either on themselves, another object, or anywhere on the drawing. Most often, objects are rotated about an endpoint, or some other point that controls the centre of rotation. So Snap should be active.

Select the tool – at first the standard Select cursor will appear. Hover over the object you wish to rotate until the cursor changes to indicate that the object is selectable; click the mouse, let go the mouse button, an move away a little. The cursor will change to the Rotate cursor and the object to be rotated will now have handles (indicating that it is selected).

Now move the Rotation cursor to the point about which you want the rotation to occur – lets say an endpoint. When you are there, the Rotation cursor will change to indicate it has found the endpoint. Click and hold the mouse button, and drag away from the endpoint. This will draw a (temporary) line; let go the mouse button and drag sideways which will draw a (temporary) arc of rotation and the object will start to rotate. Rotate it as far as you want to go and click the mouse to complete the operation.

As the object rotates the cursor will indicate if it finds endpoints, centers etc., and this can be used if wished to control the degree of rotation. In this way it is easy to do an exact rotation.

It may seem a little complicated, but in fact it isn't. It's best to practice with a few simple lines to get the hang of how the rotation tool works, before attempting to rotate more complex objects.